Burberry February Show: Couture Capes

During London Fashion Week Burberry's runway included 78 couture capes. I was so excited to be asked to provide ceramic elements for use in 3 of the capes; The Anthracite, The Tile and The Ceramic Lace capes. Annabel and Tom from the Burberry print team came to me with various ideas taking inspiration from Henry Moore's process and sculptures, which we worked through and sampled. Burberry seamstresses then put the capes together and I was amazed with the results!

The Show is open to the public at Makers House, until Monday 27th Feb. Here are photos of the capes I worked on and my round up of the show.

The Tile cape

The Tile cape

The Tile cape was made up of a multitude of shapes all cut like test tiles to resemble Henry Moore's working process.

The Ceramic Lace

The Ceramic Lace

Macramé lace, woven in Switzerland on traditional looms, was used on many of the garments on the ready-to-wear runway. The lace was imprinted onto the porcelain clay and wired together to allow The Ceramic Lace cape to be draped over the body.

Above, Lace Capelet with Shearling Collar. Below you can see the lace imprinted into the surface of the porcelain.

Above, Lace Capelet with Shearling Collar. Below you can see the lace imprinted into the surface of the porcelain.

A book of all of the capes is available featuring beautiful black and white images of the couture capes.

Image from the book of The Anthracite

Image from the book of The Anthracite

Henry Moore's sculptures were displayed alongside the capes, they added rich colour and grounded the show.

Henry Moore's sculptures were displayed alongside the capes, they added rich colour and grounded the show.

It was exciting to see so many of Henry Moore's illustrations and maquettes throughout Makers House.

It was exciting to see so many of Henry Moore's illustrations and maquettes throughout Makers House.

It was extremely difficult to choose a favourite out of all of the capes. The level of skills that went into all of them was jaw-dropping. Some of the capes took 500+ hours to make.

It was extremely difficult to choose a favourite out of all of the capes. The level of skills that went into all of them was jaw-dropping. Some of the capes took 500+ hours to make.

Below are a couple of the couture capes I loved.

Rope and steamed wood capes

Rope and steamed wood capes

"Each one is a unique collector's piece incorporating unexpected materials and intricate techniques."

Christopher Bailey

The ready-to-wear pieces were also all on display, I loved this shirt and The Anthracite cape was worn over the top on the runway.

The ready-to-wear pieces were also all on display, I loved this shirt and The Anthracite cape was worn over the top on the runway.

The runway how can be watched on the Makers House website here.

A still of me working on the porcelain lace cape from the craft processes video. The Cape Reimagined shows some of the processes behind the capes, watch fleeting glimpses of me working in the viedos here.

A still of me working on the porcelain lace cape from the craft processes video. The Cape Reimagined shows some of the processes behind the capes, watch fleeting glimpses of me working in the viedos here.

The coffee table book with images of all 78 capes.

The coffee table book with images of all 78 capes.

The exhibition of capes will leave London after 27th Feb and visit cities including Paris, Tokyo and Los Angeles.